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Virtual In A Pikle Party

I have taken a bit of a hiatus in posting activities. But I will return soon with things for the holidays. I do want to announce that I am having a virtual In A Pikle party.

I get really geeked up about organization. So I get excited whenever I find something else to keep me even more organized. I fell in love with my In A Pikle bag. I bought it unfilled and use it as both a purse organizer and wallet. Most times I just carry that around like a clutch and throw it into my larger family bag whenever we are going on an outing. It holds an incredible amount of stuff but remains compact. Makes a great gift for moms, a new parents’ diaper bag, or a bride who needs emergency items in one place for the big day. There are ones that don’t look like purses too – they look like little gym bags. They come in two sizes, the original Pikle size shown below and one that is a little larger called the Bundle.

If I were still practicing, I am sure I would find all sorts of uses. Holding card sets, office supply items for itinerant therapy, etc.

To find out more and order directly, go to:

https://parties.inapikle.com/parties/6089

Virtual party closes on November 14th

Here’s mine:
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Group Language Activities for Community Helpers/Jobs/Occupations

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  • Put a stack of community helper pictures face down in a pile.  Each child comes up picks and acts out 1 picture. Other children try to guess what job they are doing or who they are. The other children should use correct form of question. “Are you a ____?” The child who is the actor should use a full sentence to say “Yes, I am a ____.” or “No, I’m not a ____.”
  • Make a pile of community helper pictures and another pile of tools/objects that each worker might need to do their job. Tell the children that you have some pictures of people that have jobs in our community. Give the children clues to guess each picture. For example, “The next person uses a hose, has a red hat, and puts out fires.” Then reveal the picture when the children guess it correctly. Put each picture card on display as they are guessed. Then point to each picture and have the children clap out and say the job name.  Then show the objects one and a time. Tell the children that each person needs something special to do their job. Have the children take turns placing the objects with the correct worker.  They should practice using a full sentence such as “A firefighter uses a hose.” “A mail carrier uses a mailbag.”  If your students are more advanced you can ask them why the person might need each object or what they use the object for. “The firefighter uses the hose to spray water on the fire.”
  • Make inferences – state a situation and ask the children to think of who they might need to help them in each situation. For example, “If you were sick who would you call?” “If you needed a package delivered, who could help you?” “If you needed to order a bouquet of flowers”
  • Show a picture of a community helper or say the name of one. Each child in a small group has to come up with one association. For example, you say “mail carrier.”  Point to each child and have them quickly name 1 thing. “mailbag, mail truck, mail box, letter.” This works best with a small 3-4 sized group. Any bigger and you get repeats or there just aren’t enough tools/objects to be associated with the job.
  • After a completing a community helpers activity, talk to the children about what job they might want to do when they are adults.  Practice using the future tense, “I will be a ____.”  Have the children think of a reason why they want to do each job.
  • Each year one of my classes took a field trip to the local post office. When we came back to school, we would pretend that our classroom was a post office. First we would brainstorm things that we would need to have our own post office.  I had lots of materials ready to pull out as they named things they saw at the post office such as envelopes, cards, boxes, blue bags, old stamps, stamp pads, boxes, scale, play money, cash register, label stickers, etc.  Each member of the class had a job like we saw at the post office. Sorting, selling stamps, weighing mail, delivering mail, etc. The other children were customers. After 10 minutes or so the children enjoyed switching jobs.  HI encouraged them to use the vocabulary they learned on the trip such as: office, stamps, postcard, address, deliver, sorting, parcel, clerk. Encourage the postal workers to use language such as “Can I help you?” “This letter is going to ___.” “How many stamps do you need.”  Encourage the customers also. “I need to mail 3 letters.” “How much does my package weigh?”   The children loved this activity. When we were finished, I would have each child tell me a short story about their job in the classroom post office. I would write it for them and they would draw a picture of what they did.

Post-It Note Flag Fun

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Every once in a while I take a break from speech-language pathology posts and post about an activity or an idea that worked for keeping my toddler entertained on rainy or cold days.  Post-It notes/Sticky Note flags are one of those things that are so simple but keep my toddler entertained for a lot longer than I ever expected.  I really don’t use for myself but I have a ton in my house. I pick them up at conventions and such just for the purpose of entertaining my toddler.

We use them to talk about colors. We match the colors of the sticky notes to stuff in the house.

She likes using them to make rainbows on paper.

As pictured, we are using them to give her a manicure. It is even more fun to pick them off.

She loves rubber duckies – in the picture she has used the sticky note flags to make duck clothes and jewelry

She also loves all birds, so she likes to use the flags to make bird feathers on bird coloring pages. They are a fun, non-messy, way to add colors to a picture.

We even like them just to make collages like the one pictured below.

They are great for travel and entertainment in restaurants.

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Spring and Pond Activities

  • Spring is a time when there is a lot of talk about growth – plants grow, flowers bloom, baby animals are born.  You can talk about what grows and what does not grow with your children. Talk about how things grow and what each item might need to grow. For example – plants need sun, water, soil. Pets need water, food, plenty of exercise. Maybe things you talk about grow, but they grow in different ways. For example, a balloon grows in size when you put air into it. Instead of growing, some things actually get smaller as you use them like a candle or a pencil.
  • Bring in a few flowers. Have the children practice naming items that are bigger than a flower and things that are smaller than a flower. Or do things that are taller than a flower and things that are shorter than a flower.
  • Do a spring same/different activity.  Say 1 thing that is the same and 1 thing that is different about: bunny/chick, hat/short sleeve shirt, flower/grass, baseball/soccer, ice cream/popsicle, ant/bumble bee
  • For Earth Day – talk about what can be recycled and what can be re-used. How can the objects be re-used? Example objects are pictured below.

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  • Pretend you are going on a picnic. The children can only pick things to put in the picnic basket that being with a certain sound.  Start with /p/ for picnic and change the sound with each round.
  • Spring Up! – When you hold up a picture of spring, the children “spring up” and switch places. Before you play discuss that the word “spring” has two meanings. Also discuss what the pictures might look like before you play. You can also do this with phrases.  The children can “spring up” when they hear a phrase that has to do with spring.  For example: daffodils in gardens, leaves falling, Halloween costumes, bunnies hopping, building snowmen, planting flowers, birds chirping, swimming in a pool, playing at the beach, Christmas presents, flying kites, green grass, icicles forming.
  • Have all children stand in a circle for this phonemic awareness activity. The middle is the pond. Tell them you are going to say some words.  “If you hear a word that begins with the same sound as frog – jump into the pond.” Change up the sounds and the animals for each round.  “If you hear a word that begins with the same sound as turtle – walk slowly into the pond.” “If you heard a word that begins with the same sound as duck – fly or waddle into the pond.”  You can also reverse it. Have all the children get into the “pond.” If they hear a word that begins with the target sound they stay in, if they hear a word that does not begin with the target sound, they jump/fly/walk out.
  • Similar to the butterfly/caterpillar phonemic awareness games listed here – sort words that begin with /f/ like frog or /t/ like turtle.  Sort words that have 1 syllable like frog and 2 syllables like turtle.  Click the link to get more specific directions.
  • If you are allowed, take the children outside to look for signs of spring. Have the children practice saying what they saw using full sentences. “I saw a _____” or “I found a _____.”  Also have them practice expanding the sentence by saying where they saw or found each item.  For example, “I saw a bunny in the grass.” “I found a bug on a leaf.”  An example sheet is pictured below.

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  • A picture of a pond is a great way to work on using sentences with prepositions. Find a pond picture and pictures of pond animals, flowers, rocks, and other things you might see near a pond. Have the children place the animals on the picture and tell you where they placed them using a full sentence, “The duck is in the pond.” “The duck is flying over the pond.” “There are rocks around the pond.” etc.
  • You can also use the picture to complete a following directions activity with the children.  Give each child a picture of a pond and have them either draw or glue on the items as you give directions. For example, “Draw a green lily pad in the pond.” “Draw 5 rocks around the pond.”  Before beginning, I like to make sure the children all know the vocabulary used in the directions.
  • Do an elision task similar to this snow one but use sun words instead.  Sunglasses, sunscreen, sunny, sunshine, sunhat, sunlight, sunrise, sunburn, Sunday, sunset, sundown.  Click the link for directions.

More Speech and Language Activities for Dr. Seuss/March/Read Across America

photoSorry it is probably too late to use most of these but I wanted to add some additional activities that go along with Dr. Seuss books.  These can be done with both small and large groups. Some could be done in individual therapy as well.

Green Eggs and Ham - This is a good extension of the book that helps children expand and use complete sentences. Place 2 piles of category cards on the table. One pile for colors and one pile for food.  Have the students take turns picking a card from each pile. Have them name each color and each food. Ask the child “Would you eat (color) (food)?” For example – “Would you eat purple corn on the cob?” or “Would you eat a blue banana?”  Have the child answer in a complete sentence: “Yes, I would eat a blue banana.” or “No, I would not eat a blue banana.” For more advanced children, you can have 3 piles, the third containing locations. So the child has to say if they would or would not eat the food in the location they picked.  For example, “I would not eat a blue banana on a chair.”  After they play the game once with you, the children can take turns asking each other, “Would you eat _____.”

Wacky Wednesday – Teachers might be reading this book but children with language issues may not know what wacky means or they may have trouble explaining why the scenes are wacky.  Explain that “wacky” means silly. Tell the children that you have pictures of thing that are wacky like in the book “Wacky Wednesday.”  This is a good time to use all those “What’s Silly” picture cards. Have the children take turns picking on picture and practice saying why it is silly. Have the child show the picture card to the group and ask if there is anything else that is silly in the picture.

Cat in the Hat - Talk about different kinds of hats. Bring in a lot of different hats or have picture of them. Talk about different times you wear hats and have the children volunteer times they where hats. Talk about jobs that require hats. Have each child pick two hats – have them say one thing that is the same and one thing that is different about the two hats. Sort that hats with the children. Make piles for hats for warm weather, hats for cold weather, hat for jobs, hats for costumes, silly hats, men’s hats, lady’s hats, children’s hats, etc.  Play a blending words game with all “-at” words like the ones pictured above.  Finally, to leave or to get up to play, have the children tell you a word that rhymes with “hat.”

St. Patrick’s Day Activities Updated!

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You can go to the post here and find even more speech and language therapy activities for St. Patrick’s Day.  Have fun!

Fox in Sox Activity for Dr. Seuss Birthday

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This is a rhyming activity and class book you can make based on Fox in Socks.  It can be done with a large group and have each child make one page or with a small group and have each child made 2-3 pages.

You will need pictures of animals and pictures of clothing.  Talk about the book and fox wearing clothing on the cover. Show children pictures of the animals. Can they think of a piece of clothing that rhymes with each one?   If children are not that advanced, put the pictures of the animals on one side of the table and pictures of clothing on the other. Name each picture as you lay it out. Have the children take turns picking up an animal and the clothing that rhymes with it.   Have each child say the full sentence. “An ape is wearing a cape.” etc.

Here are the animals and clothing I used:

goat – coat

dove – glove

fly – tie

cat – hat

fox – socks

kitten – mitten

ape – cape

pig – wig

ants – pants

llamas – pajamas

Next make a class book using the pictures.  Have each child pick which animal they want. Have the pages pre-made so the children can simply glue on the pictures and color them in.  Or if your groups are more advanced, they could draw and write their own pages. Then read the whole book to the class or group. Make sure during this activity the children have plenty of opportunities to produce the rhyming pairs.

Check my previous entries. I have other Dr. Seuss’ Birthday Activities including a class book called “Nool in Our School” based on There’s a Wocket in my Pocket and a rhyming match game for One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish.

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